Botanic Gardens/Herbarium

The first trees at the gardens were planted in 1945. After a period of rapid development in the 1960s, the gardens were opened to the public in 1967. The gardens occupy about 40 hectares on Black Mountain and include a herbarium.
The herbarium houses a large collection of pressed, dried plant specimens which are used for scientific research and as a reference for the identification of plants, including those growing at the gardens. The herbarium is not open to the public, except during special events.
The gardens are also involved in research into the botany, biology and...
Covering 28 hectares on the summit of a basalt-capped peak, 1000 metres above sea level in the rugged Blue Mountains, Mount Tomah is the cool-climate garden of the Royal Botanic Gardens Sydney. The visitors centre provides displays about the garden.The theme of this Garden emphasises cool-climate plants from around the world, especially those from the southern hemisphere.It was opened to the public in 1987 and is already home to over 5000 species of plants from the cooler parts of the world. The Mount Tomah garden is one of the few botanic gardens where plants have been grouped according to...
Surely one of the most spectacular garden settings in NSW, Everglades Gardens was first opened to the public in October 1936 by owner Henri Van de Velde. This became a traditional event in the Mountains, to benefit of local charity groups, maturing into an annual festival celebrating the return of Spring. Spread over three undulating hectares, Everglades remains the perfect venue for garden and heritage enthusiasts to explore the many hidden pleasures within this National Trust listed property.
This 98-hectare wildlife sanctuary includes highly-developed educational facilities in the form of Wirrimbirra Field Studies Centre and a large area of Bargo Bush.
The Eurobodalla Regional Botanic Gardens and associated Herbarium occupy 83 ha of mostly dry forest with some moist creek areas, 5kms from the NSW south coast town of Batemans Bay. The majority of the land is undeveloped but with made tracks and enhancement plantings. Display gardens are situated in the carpark and around the visitors' centre, picnic area and arboretum. The Gardens only display regional plant species.Living plants - 10,000 plants, 1,500 species. Herbarium specimens - 8,000; photographs of local plant species - 400
The Flecker Botanical Gardens are the only Wet Tropical Botanic Gardens in Australia. The gardens aim to display tropical plant species of ornamental, economic cultural and conservation value for educational, recreational and scientific purposes with emphasis on endangered species. Many tropical countries however are underdeveloped and resource-poor which places Flecker Botanic Gardens in an important position on a national and global scale in representing flora of the Wet Tropics and Equatorial regions.There are three main areas, each representing a sample of the diverse ecosystem...
The Waite Arboretum, established in 1928, comprises 30 hectares of 2,500 labelled trees and shrubs from all over the world grown under natural rainfall. The Arboretum is located just 10 minutes drive from the centre of Adelaide. Special collections include Eucalypts (over 350 species), Pears (26), Oaks (38), Acacias (50), Banksias (50), Hakeas (60) with palms and cycads along an attractive watercourse. The adjacent Urrbrae House Historic Precinct comprises a beautiful bluestone residence which is open to the public, a magnificent Rose Garden and the Coach House Museum which houses...
The Tasmanian Herbarium is responsible for the development, maintenance and management of the botanical collections of Tasmania. These currently number c. 370,000 specimens and represent the most comprehensive scientific record of the Tasmanian flora in the world. The Herbarium undertakes research into the identification, classification and relationships of the Tasmanian flora. It also provides a wide range of botanical services to the Tasmanian community and a window to the Tasmanian flora for the rest of the world.Collections of Tasmanian plants from all groups, including algae, fungi,...
These gardens, situated on the New South Wales side of the Murray River near Mildura, are one of the few community run botanic gardens. Established in 1989, the first planting was in 1991. The gardens showcase a range of Australian natives from both arid and higher rainfall areas as well as exotic plantings grouped in country of origin. Also featured is an area developed with salt-tolerant native plants which have thrived and lowered the water table considerably; a network of walking tracks and a rose garden displaying more than 1,600 plants. The historic homestead is open on the weekend and...
The Geelong Botanic Gardens is one of the very few gardens in Victoria that has been continually highly cultivated and well
maintained. Within 1km of the city centre and overlooking
Corio Bay the gardens lie along a gently sloping gully protected from northerly winds by a tree lined ridge. The temperate climate and an average yearly rainfall of 540 millimetres allows a wide range of plants to be grown.A feature of the gardens is the majestic trees, many of which are listed on the National Trust Register. Of particular interest is the Ginkgo biloba planted in 1859 and the Jubacea...
Botanic garden of 2 hectares in forested situation in the Dandenong ranges provides specialised collections onf plants requiring varying amounts of shade and sun. Only Australian natives are grown and the garden displays flowers all year. A Horticultural Hall allows us to cater for tours and workshops. Exhibitions are regularly held. A beautiful setting for weddings, with photos in fern gully, by pools or at the lookout.Karwarra holds approx 1200 species and 2000 taxa of Australian plants.
Chiverton House is a community museum; its collection reflects changing lifestyles influenced by mining (1848-1950). The building, histories and collections relating to Capt Samuel Mitchell and his family provide a link to the convicts and Lynton Hiring Station (1853-56), the railway (1879-1957), pastoral and farming development (1850 onwards) and the local effects of events such as depressions and wars.4,000 objects include house (as operating home) objects, farm machinery (some restored) 1,000 photos include local families, identities, property homes and events.
The Park introduces visitors to the subtle richness of Australia's arid zone. Designed to move well beyond the boundaries of traditional zoos, botanic gardens and museums, the park has adopted a holistic habitat-based and story driven approach. Visitors can discover the desert in its entirety; the landscapes, animals and plants, and their traditional use and management by Aboriginal people.The Desert Park site covers 1300 hectares and is adjacent to the West MacDonnell National Park. The site is of significant cultural importance to the local Arrente people and includes parts of the Akngwelye...