Quilt No.676MH - Margaret Hedges

Margaret Hedges
Owner: 
Margaret Hedges
Location: 
VIC North West
Maker
Maker: 
Charlotte Augusta Barber
Made in
AUSTRALIA VIC
Date: 
1881 - 1900
Description: 
Crazy patchwork quilt with small patches in velvet, silk, brocade and cottons most with hand embroidery over the seams. There are many motifs such as flowers, butterflies, birds also dates, initials and names of local properties. It is padded with a thin soft material and the replacement backing (old) is satin. There is a wide rose coloured frill on all sides.
1680 x 1380mm
History: 

The quilt was made by Charlotte Augusta Barber (born Meara) probably at the property 'Mt. Taurus' or in Warrnambool in the latter part of last century. It was then owned by Charlotte Hedges, an aunt of the present owner, and now by Margaret Hedges the great grand-daughter of Charlotte Meara. It is not used now.

Story: 

Charlotte Augusta Meara was born c.1815 and went to Van Dieman's Land in 1836 later crossing over to Belfast (now Port Fairy). In 1849 she and George Barber were married and lived in Port Fairy until 1855 when they moved to the neighbouring town of Warrnambool where George Barber established himself as a solicitor. They had 3 children Anthony, Louisa Ann and Ann Eliza. After practising in Warrnambool for a number of years George and Charlotte retired to a beautiful grazing property called 'Mount Taurus Estate'. George Barber died in 1897. Charlotte moved to Warrnambool and died in 1908.

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